Reflection of the decade of the European Commission’s public consultation practice and position of the stakeholders

  • Markéta Pitrová
  • Jana Zatloukalová
Keywords: European Commission, interest groups, minimum standards for consultation, public consultation, transparency in decision-making, Your Voice in Europe

Abstract

The Lisbon revision of the primary law led to the confirmation of the pre-existing Commission’s commitment to carry out “broad consultations” while preparing European legislative acts. The aim of this article is to elucidate formulation of the Commission’s public consultation practice and evaluate positions of the interest groups to the Commission’s strategy. The attention is accorded to the analysis of the consultation’s level of formalization and inclusivity, the two principal consultation’ components. The analysis is build upon the study of the selected interest groups’ positions brought forward during the years 2002–2012 and upon the reaction of the Commission to the interest groups’ feedback. The available empirical data suggests that the interest groups appreciated the introduction of the minimum standards for consultation, however, they have been steadily alerting to their frequent breach and arbitrary application.

Author Biographies

Markéta Pitrová

Born in 1973, she is an Associate Professor at the Department of International Relations and European Studies of the Faculty of Social Studies at Masaryk University and an expert on European integration. She specializes in the political development of the EU, and its institutional issues and constitutional development. She is the author, co-author and/or editor of a series of monographs, studies and articles, a research grant beneficiary, a member of the Scientific Council of the Faculty of Social Studies at Masaryk University and a member of the editorial board of the magazine International Relations (Mezinárodní vztahy). Since 2012, she holds the title of Jean Monnet Chair.

Jana Zatloukalová

Born in 1983, she is a post-graduate student at the Department of International Relations and European Studies of the Faculty of Social Studies at Masaryk University in Brno. Since 2009 she works as a senior assistant in the Department for the EU of the Office of the Senate. In her research she deals with issues of European law-making, in particular the participation of interest groups, national parliaments and the public on EU policy making, and advocacy strategies.

Section
Consultations