Racism in Development and Development Cooperation

  • Tomáš Profant Institute of International Relations, Prague, Czech Republic; Comenius University, Bratislava, Slovakia, profant@iir.cz

Abstract

Development cooperation or aid is often perceived as a form of charity or a good deed that is being carried out only with the best intentions. Racism, on the other hand, is most often connected with right wing extremism (even though in Slovakia it is connected also with the wider political center). The basic assumption of this theoretical article is the opposite. One can find racism also in development and development cooperation. The article tries to answer the following question: What are the main forms of racism in development and development cooperation? On the basis of the extant and my own research the article categorizes the forms of racism in development and development cooperation and identifies the three main ones: development discourse, structural racism connected with the racially differentiated global capitalist system and an everyday racism connected with racially biased institutions. The conclusion poses a question regarding the way one may fight these forms of racism and briefly answers it.

Author Biography

Tomáš Profant, Institute of International Relations, Prague, Czech Republic; Comenius University, Bratislava, Slovakia, profant@iir.cz

Tomáš Profant, PhD, studied Political Science, International Relations and European Studies at Masaryk University in Brno and finished his PhD at the University of Kassel. He is a research fellow at the Institute of International Relations in Prague and a lecturer at the Institute of European Studies and International Relations at the Faculty of Social and Economic Sciences, Comenius University in Bratislava. His research interests include international political economy, North-South relations, post-development and postcolonial theory, and critical discourse analysis. He is the author of New Donors on the Postcolonial Crossroads: Eastern Europe and Western Aid.

Section
Research Articles